vocal


vocal
vocal 1 Vocal, articulate, oral can all mean uttered by the voice or having to do with utterance.
Vocal implies the use of voice, but not necessarily of speech or language; thus, vocal sounds are sounds produced by a creature that has vocal organs; vocal music is contrasted with instrumental music because the musical tones are produced by the voice rather than by a musical instrument.
Articulate implies the use of distinct intelligible language; thus, speech is the uttering of articulate sounds; articulate cries are those that are expressed in meaningful words rather than in meaningless sounds
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Constance nodded her head in thorough agreement. She did not trouble to go into articulate apologies— Bennett

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Oral implies the use of the voice rather than the hand (as in writing or typing) in communicating (as thoughts, wishes, orders, questions, or answers)
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an oral examination

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an oral command

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the oral transmission of tradition

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2 Vocal, articulate, fluent, eloquent, voluble, glib can mean being able to express oneself clearly or easily, or showing such ability.
Vocal usually implies ready responsiveness to an occasion for expression or free and usually forceful, insistent, or emphatic voicing of one's ideas or feelings
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earth's millions daily fed, a world employed in gathering plenty yet to be enjoyed, till gratitude grew vocal in the praise of God— Cowper

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this instantaneous indignation of the most impulsive and vocal of men was diligently concealed for at least six weeks, with reporters camped upon his doorstep day and night— Mencken

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Articulate is as often applied to thoughts and emotions with reference to their capacity for expression as to persons or their utterances. It implies the use of language which exactly and distinctly reveals or conveys what seeks expression
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the deepest intuitions of a race are deposited in its art; no criticism can make these wholly articulateBinyon

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the primitive poet . . . was used by the community to make its spiritual needs articulateDay Lewis

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how can you write about a literary subject . . . when you yourself are hardly articulate, can scarcely express the most commonplace thoughts— Edmund Wilson

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Fluent stresses facility in speaking or writing and copiousness in the flow of words; unlike vocal and articulate, it refers chiefly to the manner of the expression rather than to the matter seeking expression
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it was his gift to be fluent on anything or nothing— Stevenson

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The word can carry a definite suggestion of depreciation or contempt politically at the mercy of every bumptious adventurer and fluent charlatan— Shaw) but it also is the only one of these words capable of implying facility and ease *hi the use of a foreign language
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had a fluent command of idiomatic French

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Eloquent usually implies fluency but it suggests also the stimulus of powerful emotion and its expression in fervent and moving language; it is applicable not only to speakers but to writers and can be extended to things that convey similar suggestions (see also EXPRESSIVE)
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pressed his arm reassuringly, and the gesture was more eloquent than any words could be— Wolfe

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Tully was not so eloquent as thou, thou nameless column with the buried base— Byron

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the wording of the Weimar Constitution was sweet and eloquent to the ear of any democratically minded man— Shirer

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Voluble and glib both imply loquacity and are usually derogatory. Voluble suggests a flow of language that is not easily stemmed
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indulge in voluble explanations

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a voluble person, but at last the flow of words stopped— Glasgow

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Glib implies such facility in utterance as to suggest superficiality or emptiness in what is said or slipperiness or untrustworthiness in the speaker
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a glib reply

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he has a glib tongue

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their only virtue, a glib conversance with such topics as came up for discussion— Sackville-West

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Analogous words: expressing, voicing, venting (see EXPRESS vb): *expressive, sententious, eloquent

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • vocal — vocal …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • vocal — vocal, ale, aux [ vɔkal, o ] adj. • 1455; lat. vocalis « doué de la voix » 1 ♦ Qui produit la voix. Organes vocaux. Cordes vocales. 2 ♦ De la voix. Technique vocale, du chant. Par ext. Écrit pour le chant, chanté. Musique vocale (opposé à… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Vocal — Vo cal (v[=o] kal), a. [L. vocalis, fr. vox, vocis, voice: cf. F. vocal. See {Voice}, and cf. {Vowel}.] 1. Of or pertaining to the voice or speech; having voice; endowed with utterance; full of voice, or voices. [1913 Webster] To hill or valley,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • vocal — VOCÁL, Ă, vocali, e, adj. Care aparţine vocii, privitor la voce, care serveşte la formarea vocii. ♦ (muz.) Executat cu vocea, cântat din gură. – Din fr. vocal, lat. vocalis. Trimis de bogdanrsb, 13.09.2007. Sursa: DEX 98  vocál adj. m., pl.… …   Dicționar Român

  • vocal — [vō′kəl] adj. [ME < L vocalis < vox, VOICE] 1. a) uttered or produced by the voice; esp., spoken; oral [vocal sounds] b) sung or to be sung [vocal music] 2. having a voice; capable of speaking or making oral sounds …   English World dictionary

  • Vocal — Vo cal (v[=o] kal), n. [Cf. F. vocal, LL. vocalis.] [1913 Webster] 1. (Phon.) A vocal sound; specifically, a purely vocal element of speech, unmodified except by resonance; a vowel or a diphthong; a tonic element; a tonic; distinguished from a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • vocal — vocal, ale (vo kal, ka l ) adj. 1°   Qui sert à la production de la voix. Les organes vocaux. 2°   Qui s énonce, qui s exprime au moyen de la voix, par opposition à mental.    Oraison vocale, voy. oraison.    Il se dit aussi par opposition à… …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • vocal — (Del lat. vocalis). 1. adj. Perteneciente o relativo a la voz. 2. Que se expresa materialmente con la voz, hablando o cantando. 3. f. letra vocal. 4. Fon. Sonido del lenguaje humano en cuya emisión el aire espirado, con vibración laríngea y… …   Diccionario de la lengua española

  • Vocal — bezeichnet einen in einem sonst ausschließlich instrumental geprägten Musikstück oft wiederholten kurzen Gesang oder Spruch. Im Extremfall besteht es nur aus einem einzigen Wort. Sein Zweck ist es, den Hörer zum Mitsingen zu animieren und den… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • vocal — (adj.) late 14c., spoken, oral, from O.Fr. vocal, from L. vocalis sounding, sonorous, speaking, as a noun, a vowel, from vox (gen. vocis) voice (see VOICE (Cf. voice)). In reference to music (as opposed to instrumental), first recorded 1580s;… …   Etymology dictionary


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